NEW YORK FEDERAL COURT ALLOWS SEXUAL ORIENTATION DISCRIMINATION CASE TO PROCEED

In Philpott v. State of New York, No. 16 CIV 6778 (AKH) (S.D.N.Y. May 3, 2017) (order granting in part and denying in part defendant’s motion to dismiss), an ongoing case in the Southern District of New York that bears following as it progresses, a federal judge ruled that the plaintiff’s claim for sexual orientation discrimination was cognizable under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e, et seq. (“Title VII”), and therefore, could proceed.

Philpott is a former Vice President of Student Affairs at SUNY’s College of Optometry who filed this case against the state of New York, the University of the State of New York and State University of New York claiming that he was discriminated against and harassed on the basis of his sexual orientation under both Title VII and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. § 1681, et seq. (“Title IX”) and chemical dependence under the Americans with Disabilities Act and that he was terminated shortly after he made those complaints. The gist of Philpott’s discrimination claim was that over a period of several years, the president of SUNY Optometry, and one of plaintiff’s co-workers 1) made a range of discriminatory comments directed at him; 2) excluded him from meetings and projects because of his sexual orientation; and 3) when he finally complained about this discrimination, his employment was terminated shortly thereafter. Defendants filed motions to dismiss and prior to the court’s decision, plaintiff dismissed all the defendants except SUNY and also dismissed his ADA claim. As such, the court needed to determine whether he had cognizable claims under Title VII and/or Title IX against SUNY and, if he did, whether he had stated a plausible claim.

As to any possible claim under Title VII, Judge Hellerstein first noted that while the Second Circuit has held that that title does not prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation, in a March 27, 2017 decision in Christiansen v. Omnicom Grp., Inc., 852 F.3d 195 (2d Cir. 2017), the Second Circuit held that though a sexual orientation discrimination claim was not cognizable under Title VII, “a claim based on the gender stereotyping theory of sex discrimination” was. Judge Hellerstein went on to point out that in Christiansen, two of the three judges joined in a concurring opinion that he said, “persuasively outlines why sexual orientation discrimination is a form of sex discrimination and should therefore be cognizable under Title VII.” Essentially, the Christiansen concurrence stated that sexual orientation is sex discrimination because “it treats otherwise similarly-situated people differently solely because of their sex” because “sexual orientation cannot be defined or understood without reference to sex.” The concurrence went on to say that “such discrimination is inherently based on gender stereotypes.”

Judge Hellerstein then noted that on April 4, 2017, the Seventh Circuit, in an en banc decision in Hively v. Ivy Tech Cmty. Coll. of Indiana, 853 F.3d 339 (7th Cir. 2017) (en banc), became the first federal circuit court of appeals “to unequivocally hold that ‘discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is a form of sex discrimination’ and therefore cognizable under Title VII.” The Hively court stated that it was compelled to make that determination by “the common-sense reality that it is actually impossible to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation without discriminating on the basis of sex.” Based on the Christiansen concurrence and the Seventh Circuit’s decision in Hively, the court determined that Philpott’s allegations in the complaint had stated a claim for gender stereotyping discrimination, even though he had framed his complaint in terms of sexual orientation discrimination.

The court did, however, dismiss Philpott’s claims under Title IX because it held that the remedies available under Title IX are limited to student plaintiffs and do not extend to employment discrimination claims.

Obviously, this case bears following as it progresses, especially considering the Seventh Circuit’s decision in Hively.

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